Tag Archives: intelligence

Diversity FAQ’s No 19: How is diversity connected to Business Strategy: Part III – ‘Decision making’


 “All human beings are necessarily products of their environment” – Burrhus Fredic Skinner, Professor of Psychology, Harvard University

The above statement by Skinner, though true, implies a limitation: that human beings are limited by what they know. Indeed, what they know, and that which limits them, is derived from the socio-economic, cultural and political interactions they have within their specific environments. But it is also true to say that of all living things on the planet, human beings constitute that species which has the ingrained ability to constantly overcome these apparent limitations – through the effective use of intelligence – and herein lies the key point our topic of discussion attempts to answer:

It is my thinking that at the heart of effective decision-making lies the question of intelligence, that rational ability all human beings use to overcome their natural limitations so as to aspire toward greater levels of intelligibility and hence higher strategic clarity. The process of overcoming Skinnner’s environmental constraints, I suggest, necessarily involves engaging a varied number of ‘intelligencies’ – and by implication their related range of experiences – using these as strategic building blocks during the decision-making process to access higher levels of intelligibility. Continue reading

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On: A Philosophy of Diversity…


In attempting to develop an understanding of the meaning of the concept of ‘diversity’, it is arguable to suggest that the best place to begin is by attempting an answer of the following 3 core philosophical questions: “Who am I?”, “Where am I going”?, “What does existence mean?”

Attempts to answer these questions can be traced back to a number of known philosophical thinkers:  Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, St Augustine, Rene Descartes, Immanuel Kant, John Locke, Martin Heidegger, Tielhard de Chardin, John Paul Sartre, etc – all of whom dominated the ancient, medieval and contemporary and modern philosophical periods.

But what was the common denominator running through the varied arguments each thinker posed? Arguably, I suggest it was attempting an understanding of the meaning of ‘existence’: What was it? What did it mean? Indeed, how am I connected to it?

I remember when studying philosophy at university, I was particularly interested in the theories of ‘identity’. The existentialist philosophy of Jean-Paul Sartre took my particular fancy. Continue reading

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